Weekly Digest, Episode 6

calendar_smallI’m late on my weekly post, but I have a lot of numbers to share. Here’s the week:

  • 1/31: 179 words
  • 2/1: 675 words
  • 2/2: 1,172 words
  • 2/3: 1,643 words
  • 2/4: 1,627 words
  • 2/5: 1,513 words
  • 2/6: 552 words
  • Weekly Total: 7,361 words

I’ll add in some other stats that might be useful if you’re looking for some inspiration to get your word counts up. Since the beginning of the year, I’ve written 45,191 words. Since I started using Chris Fox’s sprinting method back in August, I’ve written 245,446 words.

And as of 2/6, my total lifetime fiction words written sits at 946,065.

That last number is important, because a million words is typically touted as kind of a magic number. In other words, many writers claim they started to really hit their stride around this point. As I approach my tenth novel and a million words, I’m feeling it too. I think I’m telling some of the best stories I ever have, in my own voice and with a confidence I didn’t have before.

As of 2/6 I’ve written for 81 days without a miss. You’ll notice above that on 1/31 I only wrote 179 words; that’s the day I spent nine hours revising Badlands #3. I did a fifteen minute sprint that day on new words solely to keep the streak going. Streaks are like that; once you get one started you don’t want to break it.

Lately I’m averaging about 1,500 words per hour and roughly 1,400 words per day. My weird western brought my average down since it seemed to take longer to write. Not sure why. My average speed is coming back up again on this new book, even without an outline. No two books are ever the same experience, so I suppose there’ll be some variance across them.

Familiar Lies, the new murder mystery I’m currently writing, is chugging right along. I’ve been working on it for 29 days now and expect to finish on time. And now that I’m proofreading as I go, I won’t have to revise the entire manuscript after the last scene is written. That’s been another game changer for me. Most I’ll do is read it one time through, full speed, before it goes off to the editor. That’s easy.

I’m still working without an outline and learning exactly what happened right alongside the protagonist. Will I go back to using outlines on future books? I don’t know. I think maybe I needed them earlier in the game, when I wasn’t confident I could finish a story. I don’t know that I need an outline as a crutch anymore. I suppose I think of outlines these days as tools that I might use, but don’t have to use.

Good week. I’ll be back after this week is over to tell you how it went.

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